Last edited by Mezibar
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

2 edition of governance of not-for-profit firms found in the catalog.

governance of not-for-profit firms

Edward L. Glaeser

governance of not-for-profit firms

by Edward L. Glaeser

  • 313 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Nonprofit organizations -- Management.,
  • Corporate governance.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementEdward L. Glaeser.
    SeriesNBER working paper series -- working paper 8921, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 8921.
    ContributionsNational Bureau of Economic Research.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination61 p. ;
    Number of Pages61
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22435008M

    Get this from a library! The governance of not-for-profit firms. [Edward L Glaeser; National Bureau of Economic Research.]. Directors and corporate governance personnel of public, private, and not-for-profit organizations must read this book."-Professor Raphael H. Amit, Director of Goergen Entrepreneurial Management Program, Wharton School of Business "Fred Lipman is considered by many directors and CEOs to be the preeminent expert on corporate governance in the Price: $

    In some cases, not-for-profit firms appear to work extremely well: competition for workers, customers, and donors leads not-for-profit organizations to function as efficiently as any for-profit firm. In other contexts, large endowments and weak governance allow elite workers to maximize their own interests, rather than those of their donors.   Editor’s Note: Alison Mudditt’s recent post on building an effective governing board mentioned Joe Esposito’s “evergreen” post from about governance and the not-for-profit publisher, which made me realize that we hadn’t revisited that post since I felt it was time to dig it out of our dusty attic and bring it back into the light.

    The following resources are created and intended as an individual benefit of AICPA Not-for-Profit Section membership. The materials are copyrighted and may not be used without permission this includes any further distribution of the materials (including posting on a website).   Why Nonprofit Governance is Different from For-profit Governance Published on: May 4, by Gene Takagi Category: BOARDS / GOVERNANCE 1 Comment The basic legal duties of care and loyalty apply whether you’re a board member of a nonprofit or for-profit corporation, but what you’re responsible for overseeing may be very different.


Share this book
You might also like
Beyond God the Father

Beyond God the Father

Rails across the midlands

Rails across the midlands

French bistro cooking.

French bistro cooking.

Introducing the source level debugger.

Introducing the source level debugger.

To make and to alter their constitutions of government

To make and to alter their constitutions of government

List of narrow gauge passenger & goods locomotive engines belonging to the Great Western Railway Company.

List of narrow gauge passenger & goods locomotive engines belonging to the Great Western Railway Company.

Washington Off the Beaten Path

Washington Off the Beaten Path

I do, I undo, I redo

I do, I undo, I redo

How to counteract environmental poisons

How to counteract environmental poisons

governments record 1906-1913

governments record 1906-1913

Mid-century drama

Mid-century drama

Royal artists

Royal artists

Governance of not-for-profit firms by Edward L. Glaeser Download PDF EPUB FB2

In some cases, not-for-profit firms appear to work extremely well: competition for workers, customers, and donors leads not-for-profit organizations to function as efficiently as any for-profit firm. In other contexts, large endowments and weak governance allow elite workers to maximize their own interests, rather than those of their donors.

Not-for-profit organizations play a critical role in the American economy. In health care, education, culture, and religion, we trust not-for-profit firms to serve the interests of their donors, customers, employees, and society at large.3/5(1). Not-for-profit organizations play a critical role in the American economy.

In health care, education, culture, and religion, we trust not-for-profit firms to serve the interests of their donors, customers, employees, and society at large. We know that such firms don't try to maximize profits, but what do they maximize.

This book attempts to answer that question. In some cases, not-for-profit firms appear to work extremely well: competition for workers, customers, and donors leads not-for-profit organizations to function as efficiently as any for-profit firm.

In other contexts, large endowments and weak governance allow elite workers to maximize their own interests, rather than those of their donors Author: Edward L.

Glaeser. In some cases, not-for-profit firms appear to work extremely well: competition for workers, customers, and donors leads not-for-profit organizations to function as efficiently as any for-profit firm.

In other contexts, large endowments and weak governance allow elite workers to maximize their own interests, rather than those of their donors Author: Edward L. Glaeser. First, schools are not profit maximizing firms. They are more like not-for-profit firms, and thus may depart from profit-maximizing behavior (Duggan.

The Governance of Not-For-Profit Firms Edward L. Glaeser. NBER Working Paper No. Issued in May NBER Program(s):Law and Economics, Public Economics Many factors including incentive-pay, powerful shareholders, and takeover threats push for-profits managers towards maximizing shareholder by: May 1.

WEIL:\\12\ Not-For-Profit Practice Group. Not-For-Profit Governance and “Best Practices” Not-for-profit organizations play a significant role in our society by undertaking and providing funding for.

Accounting and financial reporting standards have evolved and been established for U.S. government and not-for-profit entities. Financial reporting by government and not-for-profit entities is a broad and diverse territory.

The world of financial accounting and reporting can be divided into two hemispheres: for-profit business entities and not-for-profit entities. A large. This volume focuses on the performance of firms as a measure of the effectiveness of corporate governance, and then attempts to draw conclusions about the relative advantages of different ownership structures.

The analysis is based on studies of firms in. This third edition of The Effective Not-for-Profit Board discusses NPO governance within the current regulatory and stakeholder environment.

It focuses on the board of directors, since it is the board that bears the ultimate responsibility for the stewardship of an organization. Governance is the way the rules, norms, and actions are structured, sustained, regulated, and held accountable.

The degree of formality depends on the internal rules of a given organization and, externally, with its business partners.

Guide to Good Governance NOT-FOR-PROFIT AND CHARITABLE ORGANIZATIONS ii About the Authors PrinciPal authors Anne Corbett Anne Corbett is a Senior Partner with the law firm of Borden Ladner Gervais LLP in Toronto, where she. firm’s West Region Leader for the Education and Not-for-Profit Industry within the United States.

Nancy is a frequent speaker at AICPA and state CPA confer-ences on financial reporting and accounting issues affecting not-for-profit orga-nizations and is currently a member of the AICPA Not-for-Profit Expert Panel.

The Governance of Not-For-Profit Firms Edward L. Glaeser NBER Working Paper No. May JEL No. G3, H4 ABSTRACT Many factors including incentive-pay, powerful shareholders, and takeover threats push for-profits managers towards maximizing shareholder value.

One of the most striking factors about non-profit firms. Downloadable. Many factors including incentive-pay, powerful shareholders, and takeover threats push for-profits managers towards maximizing shareholder value.

One of the most striking factors about non-profit firms is that they have no comparable governance institutions, and the only check on managers are boards that are themselves rarely responsible to anyone outside the firm. 17 Thoughts on "Governance and the Not-for-profit Publisher" This article is spot-on and the issues mentioned are exactly what the NFP society publisher I work for has struggled with.

Now we have taken on Editorial and Production publishing professionals the journal is going from strength to strength. The Effective Not-for-Profit Board. to provide Not-for-Profit Organizations (NPOs) with a discussion of the issues surrounding governance.

Our objective was to assist them in forming their own coherent response to the challenges of implementing an effective governance system. Since then, governance practices have evolved considerably. How can good governance help law firm owners to make better decisions?  How can governance incorporate management information and concepts of risk management into the decision-making process.

The fourth in this popular series on the business of law, published in association with the International Bar Association, the book concludes with an examination of.

Governing boards in the for-profit and nonprofit contexts share many legal precepts: the oversight role, the decision-making power, their place in the organizational structure, and their members’ fiduciary duties.

But in the nonprofit setting, misconceptions about corporate governance abound. Are board members primarily fundraisers?. The Governance of Not-For-Profit Firms.

By Edward L. Glaeser. Download PDF ( KB) Abstract. Many factors including incentive-pay, powerful shareholders, and takeover threats push for-profits managers towards maximizing shareholder value. One of the most striking factors about non-profit firms is that they have no comparable governance.The Not-for-Profit Governance Principles (Principles) have been developed by the Australian Institute of Company Directors (AICD) as part of its commitment to promote good governance in the not-for-profit- (NFP) sector.

The Principles are a practical framework to help NFPs understand and achieve good governance.Get this from a library! The governance of not-for-profit firms. [Edward L Glaeser; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- Abstract: Many factors including incentive-pay, powerful shareholders, and takeover threats push for-profits managers towards maximizing shareholder value.

One of the most striking factors about.